Amazons Slayed in Pants.  Really Obnoxious Pants.

elodieunderglass:

thescarletlibrarian:

This post about Greek and Roman pants rolled through my dash with a be-pantsed Amazon…

image

(Exhibit A, c. 470 BC, rocking some utilitarian pants and long sleeves and what appears to be Greek-style linothorax body armor.)

…and we all know what I did next.  I googled the hell out of that shit because Amazons in pants.  And armor!  If you don’t know why that got me so excited you probably haven’t read my post on sexily functional women’s armor yet.  And what I found was not only more pants…

image

Including these, and I will explain in another post why I think they may be armor pants, but also these…

image

Oh, yes.  If you’re going to wear pants to stay warm and prevent saddle-sores, as many a Central-Asian cavalry culture does, you might as well wear stylin’ pants.  But it gets better.

image

Here we have a reconstruction of statue of of a Trojan archer wearing Scythian clothes.  Chemical analysis of paint residue on classical statues has revealed that they were, in fact, gaudy as a ‘70s rally (this is also true of medieval churches and other buildings), although this dude is spectacularly obnoxious.  

That’s right, folks.  The original Wonder Women were glamazons.  

This diamond or zigzag pattern is the most common one on most of the images I’ve looked at (and there are HUNDREDS, it turns out), and I have an opinion about that, but it’s not the only one, because no girl wants to show up to battle looking just like everybody else.  

image

Here Antiope wears a striking linear pattern, with some polka-dots to break it up–but is she as into their relationship as Theseus is?

image

At the Amazon-Greek mixer, the boys brought no interesting fashion to the party, but the girls were on point as always!  Here another polka-dot look, there zigzag pants, and what may be tattoos on the lady just left of center, while the one on the far right looks to be rocking either a zigzag tunic or scalemail body armor.  

image

Hipster Amazons, wearing leggings and dresses before it was cool, with a fun diamond mix.  Shouldn’t you look as sharp as your sword?

image

Stars and spots, zigzags and dots!  This season’s Glamazons are mixing their patterns, lots and lots!  

image

An axe blade is a chunky accessory–complement it with big patterns and designs to emphasize your bold look.

image

This boss lady is stepping out against Theseus and Rhoceus in a sort of front-closing jacket and skirt affair, adding another layer to a great look.

image

This girl knows her diamonds-and-dots front-closing bodysuit look goes perfectly both with both her triangle skirt and her Spear of Ass-Kicking.

image

Bold borders are the perfect way to make a statement as you rain down death and destruction.

image

A solid strip of color right down the center lengthens your lines and makes you look even taller and more menacing–not that you need the help!

image

Multiple weapons?  Check.  Multiple layers?  Check.  Multiple patterns and colors?  Check and check!

image

These two trend-setters enjoy a break from the action in elegantly draped ensembles, one sporting both a belt and a crossover chest accessory.

image

Match a flowing minidress with over-the-hell leggings for comfortable, durable activewear–and by that we mean asskickingwear, of course!

image

Great both in the saddle and on foot!

image

There’s plenty for the girl who prefers a more form-fitting approach, too!

*grizzled war veteran voice* do you remember when real men wore skirts and the Trousers was Barbaric… when wearin’ a tunic with jeggings was visual shorthand fer pure Wildness

I am working on a larger post about pants and the SCAdian culture that says ladies have to wear dresses (spoiler alert – you don’t).

In the meantime, have some Period Glamazons with pants and leggings.

<3 <3

ROMAN BIBLIOGAPHY! And a #romanselfie

FIrst of all, have my Pinterest Board: [Link]

And a Pinterest for Roman rings: [Link]

Titles that are bold are things I have used personally and can vouch for.

The World of Roman Costume
by Judith Lynn Sebesta and Larissa Bonfante
University of Wisconsin Press, 1994
[Link]

Dress and the Roman Woman: Self-preservation and Society
by Kelly Olson
New York: Routledge, 2008
[Link]

Cosmetics and Perfumes in the Roman World
by Susan Stewart
Stroud: Tempus, 2007
[Link]

Roman Clothing and Fashion
by Alexandra Croom
Charleston, SC: Tempus, 2000
[Link]

Greek and Roman Textiles and Dress: An Interdisciplinary Anthology
by Mary Harlow and Marie-Louise Nosch
Philadelphia: Oxbow, 2015
[Link]

Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture
by J.C. Edmondson and Alison Mary Keith
University of Toronto Press, 2008
[Link]

Anachronistic and Impulsive – Anna’s Rome: A View of Ancient Rome and Byzantium in the Current Middle Ages
http://annasrome.com/
by Her Excellency Anna Dokeianina Syrakousina
HE Anna is also on Facebook, and runs the SCA Byzanteam group, full of helpful folk. She is very approachable and awesome.