Child’s sock, from Musée Guimet

museeguimet:

Chaussette (ou sous-chaussure ?) d’enfant

dynastie Tang (618-90
damas, sergé, soie
Chine

© Musée Guimet, Paris, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Benjamin Soligny / Raphaël Chipault

Section Textile du musée Guimet

So apparently the Musée Guimet’s tumblr is now defunct. This post is originally from December 29, 2013. This is me testing this to see if I can cite the reblog… Because you always cite your stuff. <3

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Women’s Writing of Ancient Mesopotamia (New Book!)

ishtargates:

A new book has just been released by Cambridge University Press entitled Women’s Writing of Ancient Mesopotamia An Anthology of the Earliest Female Authors!

It is an anthology of translations from the ancient Near East of various writings by women.  The translations include letters, religious hymns, inscriptions, prophecies, and various other types of texts.  All of them considered some of the earliest examples of writing done by women in history.  The only downside is that the book is quite expensive right, but hopefully that will change in the future and/or a paperback edition will soon follow.

You can purchase it from Cambridge’s site, (even their U.K. site), or on Amazon where the Kindle is somewhat less expensive.

Regardless this is one of the best additions to ancient Near Eastern scholarship in recent years.

~Hasmonean

We’re the Mesopotaaaaamiiiiiiaaaans. <3

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The Thing That Goes Nyoom

thoodleoo:

the proto-indo-european word for horse, ekwos (which shows up in other indo-european languages, such as the latin equus and the greek ἵππος), very possibly comes from an adjective h₁eḱus, meaning “swift”

so basically at some point people were coming up with a word for horse and they were like “it’s the thing that goes nyoom”

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Amazons Slayed in Pants.  Really Obnoxious Pants.

elodieunderglass:

thescarletlibrarian:

This post about Greek and Roman pants rolled through my dash with a be-pantsed Amazon…

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(Exhibit A, c. 470 BC, rocking some utilitarian pants and long sleeves and what appears to be Greek-style linothorax body armor.)

…and we all know what I did next.  I googled the hell out of that shit because Amazons in pants.  And armor!  If you don’t know why that got me so excited you probably haven’t read my post on sexily functional women’s armor yet.  And what I found was not only more pants…

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Including these, and I will explain in another post why I think they may be armor pants, but also these

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Oh, yes.  If you’re going to wear pants to stay warm and prevent saddle-sores, as many a Central-Asian cavalry culture does, you might as well wear stylin’ pants.  But it gets better.

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Here we have a reconstruction of statue of of a Trojan archer wearing Scythian clothes.  Chemical analysis of paint residue on classical statues has revealed that they were, in fact, gaudy as a ‘70s rally (this is also true of medieval churches and other buildings), although this dude is spectacularly obnoxious.  

That’s right, folks.  The original Wonder Women were glamazons.  

This diamond or zigzag pattern is the most common one on most of the images I’ve looked at (and there are HUNDREDS, it turns out), and I have an opinion about that, but it’s not the only one, because no girl wants to show up to battle looking just like everybody else.  

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Here Antiope wears a striking linear pattern, with some polka-dots to break it up–but is she as into their relationship as Theseus is?

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At the Amazon-Greek mixer, the boys brought no interesting fashion to the party, but the girls were on point as always!  Here another polka-dot look, there zigzag pants, and what may be tattoos on the lady just left of center, while the one on the far right looks to be rocking either a zigzag tunic or scalemail body armor.  

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Hipster Amazons, wearing leggings and dresses before it was cool, with a fun diamond mix.  Shouldn’t you look as sharp as your sword?

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Stars and spots, zigzags and dots!  This season’s Glamazons are mixing their patterns, lots and lots!  

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An axe blade is a chunky accessory–complement it with big patterns and designs to emphasize your bold look.

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This boss lady is stepping out against Theseus and Rhoceus in a sort of front-closing jacket and skirt affair, adding another layer to a great look.

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This girl knows her diamonds-and-dots front-closing bodysuit look goes perfectly both with both her triangle skirt and her Spear of Ass-Kicking.

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Bold borders are the perfect way to make a statement as you rain down death and destruction.

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A solid strip of color right down the center lengthens your lines and makes you look even taller and more menacing–not that you need the help!

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Multiple weapons?  Check.  Multiple layers?  Check.  Multiple patterns and colors?  Check and check!

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These two trend-setters enjoy a break from the action in elegantly draped ensembles, one sporting both a belt and a crossover chest accessory.

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Match a flowing minidress with over-the-hell leggings for comfortable, durable activewear–and by that we mean asskickingwear, of course!

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Great both in the saddle and on foot!

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There’s plenty for the girl who prefers a more form-fitting approach, too!

*grizzled war veteran voice* do you remember when real men wore skirts and the Trousers was Barbaric… when wearin’ a tunic with jeggings was visual shorthand fer pure Wildness

I am working on a larger post about pants and the SCAdian culture that says ladies have to wear dresses (spoiler alert – you don’t).

In the meantime, have some Period Glamazons with pants and leggings.

<3 <3

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staaaaaaaaahp: [Ladies in Pants, 2]

runic-keyblade:

scareferencedesk:

sca-nerd:

Can we PLEASE stop telling new or interested women in the SCA that they can’t wear pants? And don’t you DARE play that, “striving to be historically accurate” card on me. It is perfectly accurate for women to wear pants! And besides, it’s not about WHO is wearing the garb, it’s about the garb itself.

There is no restriction. You are welcomed and encouraged to wear whatever period and style you have an interest to wear!

If
the persona you wish to play wears pants, then by all means wear pants.
If you as a PERSON are more comfortable in pants, then wear pants! As
long as you are making an attempt to have the garb be period, then you
have met the expectations of the SCA.

I can document pants for ladies.

Come at me.

I also have cookies. 😀 <3

…documentable pants for ladies? 

tell me more >.> 

@runic-keyblade You have to go east of Constantinople – fair warning.
I’ll compile some options and work on a post.

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staaaaaaaaahp: [Ladies in Pants]

sca-nerd:

Can we PLEASE stop telling new or interested women in the SCA that they can’t wear pants? And don’t you DARE play that, “striving to be historically accurate” card on me. It is perfectly accurate for women to wear pants! And besides, it’s not about WHO is wearing the garb, it’s about the garb itself.

There is no restriction. You are welcomed and encouraged to wear whatever period and style you have an interest to wear!

If
the persona you wish to play wears pants, then by all means wear pants.
If you as a PERSON are more comfortable in pants, then wear pants! As
long as you are making an attempt to have the garb be period, then you
have met the expectations of the SCA.

I can document pants for ladies.

Come at me.

I also have cookies. 😀 <3

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Model of Carpenter’s Adze from Hatshepsut’s Temple

ancientpeoples:

Model Carpenter’s Adze from Hatshepsut’s Temple

New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, ca. 1479–1458 B.C., joint reign of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III.

From Egypt, Upper Egypt, Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, Temple of Hatshepsut, Foundation Deposit 1 (A), Egypt Exploration Fund, 1894–95.

Wood, bronze or copper alloy, leather

L. of handle 19.6 cm (7 11/16 in.) L. of blade 15.7 cm (6 3/16 in.); W. 5.3 cm (2 1/16 in.)

The handle of this adze is inscribed “The Good God, Maatkare, beloved of Amun, foremost of Djeser-Djeseru.” Maatkare was the throne name of the female pharaoh Hatshepsut, and Djeser-Djeseru (Holy of Holies) was the name of her mortuary temple at Deir el-Bahri. The adze was uncovered in one of the temple’s foundation deposits by the Museum’s Egyptian Expedition. Although the adze is full-size and appears to be functional, the blade is too thin to be used for cutting and, like most of the tools discovered in foundation deposits, this is a model.

Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art

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