Racial Diversity

medievalpoc:

Ashburnham Pentateuch

f. 65v: A mother and father grieve for their child

Spain or Italy (5th or 6th C.)

Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, MS nouv. acq. lat. 2334

Consider this manuscript in light of the article I posted 2 days ago about historical European mixed race families. A lot of similar articles go right from Roman Britain to Renaissance Italy, but documents like this that often bridge the historical “gap” because go unremarked upon because they’re often not considered analgous to written records or artistic depictions. What they do, rather, is show that in the imagination of artists during this time, racial diversity was part of their social consciousness and how they envisioned concepts like “a family”. My thanks to Dr Caitlin R Green on bringing this manuscript to my attention.

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bodleianlibs:

MARCH. The traditional labour of the month is trimming trees. You can either do this delicately with a billhook, like the gentleman on the left, or DECISIVELY with an axe, like the gentleman on the right.

You can view the original of this image for free online!

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I am looking for something *like* a period or late period family tree….except it would be for a household or an order. I have been looking for things like “Armorial Trees” but I can’t really figure out what they would be called or where to even begin documenting them. Any ideas?

image

(MS Lat. misc. e. 86, f. 37v-38r, Bodelian Lbrary, Treatise on heraldry, also known as “Ashmole Tract.”)

I would look at royal lineages or “Trees of Jesse.” If you’re more interested in showcasing someone’s arms, then search “roll of arms.”

Here’s an early 14th century “Genealogical Roll of the Kings of England”: [Link]

Here’s a chronicle with some genealogies from the last part of the 15th century: [Link]

Here’s an early 15th century manuscript with some genealogical trees: [Link]

This 12th century manuscript has a “tree of consanguinity” (blood relations): [Link]

I’d also encourage you to search the Bodleian library for “genealogy” or “roll of arms.”

This might work too – this is from the British Library’s Stowe 594 (c. 1430-1440), f. 7v-8r. It shows Edward III and Henry, Duke of Lancaster, of the Order of the Garter. They are wearing their own arms on a surcoat, plus the mantle of the order, and they are standing next to the arms of their successors in their Garter stalls (I’m not sure what that means, but there you go): [Link]

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houghtonlib:

Take a closer look at our digitized collections than ever before with our brand new image viewer. Click the “View in Beta” button from any digitized book to try it out. The new site offers easier browsing, enhanced zoom, and the ability to compare images side-by-side.  This site is still in beta testing, so let us know if you have any feedback.

MS Lat 253

Houghton Library, Harvard University

Yay more scribal resources!

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FREE EBOOK: The Art of Illumination: The Limbourg Brothers and the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry | MetPublications | The Metropolitan Museum of Art   

FREE EBOOK: The Art of Illumination: The Limbourg Brothers and the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry | MetPublications | The Metropolitan Museum of Art   

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