Pen and parchment : drawing in the Middle Ages / Melanie Holcomb ; with contributions by Lisa Bessette, Barbara Drake Boehm, Evelyn M. Cohen, Kathryn Gerry, Ludovico V. Geymonat, Aden Kumler, Lawrence Nees, William Noel, Wendy A. Stein, Faith Wallis, Karl Whittington, Elizabeth Williams, and Nancy Wu :: Metropolitan Museum of Art Publications

Pen and parchment : drawing in the Middle Ages / Melanie Holcomb ; with contributions by Lisa Bessette, Barbara Drake Boehm, Evelyn M. Cohen, Kathryn Gerry, Ludovico V. Geymonat, Aden Kumler, Lawrence Nees, William Noel, Wendy A. Stein, Faith Wallis, Karl Whittington, Elizabeth Williams, and Nancy Wu :: Metropolitan Museum of Art Publications

Want to share this?

This belongs to you. Fabris’s Sienza d’Arme, the best rapier book ever, yours free.

This belongs to you. Fabris’s Sienza d’Arme, the best rapier book ever, yours free.

Want to share this?

xiao3la4jiao1:

 Reconstructions of various Tang dynasty hairstyles, found on baidu (link) but true source unknown.

This is from:

Hair Fashions of Tang Dynasty Women, by He, Jian’guo.何建國.

You can see the Library of Congress record here: https://lccn.loc.gov/88123343

But you can’t check it out from them right now, because I have their copy sitting on my desk. c.c

Want to share this?

Hello there! Could you perhaps refer to me any other sca or renfaire tumblrs similar to yours? Sorry if you already have a page for this but i’m on mobile atm.

image

Detail from Leiden University Library, 1610, by Jan Cornelis Woudanus [Link]

Goodness! That’s tough… How about some people/organizations that I follow and adore? Will that work?

(If someone knows about a tumblr similar to mine, please let me know! Because that is awesome. 😀 )

@medievalpoc
@medievalistsnet
@openmarginalis
@elenarosadavenezia
@featherbottomcorner
@sca-nerd
@britishlibraryimages
@upennmanuscripts
@sexycodicology
@eadfrith
@villagenerd
@valkyriehistorian
@historyoffashion

If I missed a nifty one, reblog and let me know!

Want to share this?

Hi! Me again! :D I was wondering if you’d seen any really good 11th century Russian illumination? At April coronation, it’s one of competition categories, so I’m starting early.

No, but I can find some. I’m a librarian! 😀

(Sorry – I just did a binge-watch of all The Librarian movies to gear myself up for the TV show. Every time he announced, “I’m The Librarian,” I giggled.)

OKAY SO.

To start, how about the The Codex Assemanianus?

It was probably 10th century, but it’s still cool. You can read more about it here [link], and there are two pages of scans from it [link] [link]. Quite a few of these pages would be really easy to translate into SCA awards. I might do a few blanks myself for our current blank drive… Here are a couple of my favorites:
image

f. 157v

image

f. 10r

</p></But if we want to be firmly in the 11th Century, how about the Ostromir Gospels? These date to 1056-7. You can find more info at the National Library of Russia [link]. I’ve known scribes who have used this. That is, looking at it, I’m going “OH HEY. This is what so-and-so used!” Have a sample:

image

f. 2r

Lastly, there is the Arkhangelsk Gospel, also know as the Archangel Gospel, which dates to 1092, making it the fourth oldest Slavic manuscript we have. You can view the whole thing online at the Russia State Library [link].

Have fun browsing!

Want to share this?

Have a Kindle? FREE EBOOK: Edward Plantagenet, The English Justinian

Have a Kindle? FREE EBOOK: Edward Plantagenet, The English Justinian

Want to share this?

sofitheviking:

shoomlah:

I briefly mentioned the book Pharaonic Egyptian Clothing (one of the few available surveys on, predictably, pharaonic Egyptian clothing) in my historical fashion master post some months ago, but I also mentioned that it’s out of print and a royal pain in the butt to get your hands on.

Seeing how I’m never one to selfishly hoard good reference (and I’m tired of checking it out of the library over and over again like I’m Belle or something), I finally scanned the whole damn thing and uploaded it HERE for you to download and peruse!

(point of note: this book was published in 1993 so there’s always a slim chance that some of this information might be considered out of date over the past twenty-odd years, but there are so few resources dedicated to the topic that I’m more than willing to take that chance.)

Enjoy, let me know if the link stops working, and go draw some historically accurate Egyptian people!  NOW.  GO GOGOGOGO.

YES THIS NEEDS TO HAPPEN.

Boosting the signal. 🙂

Want to share this?